Capture Myopathy

Capture myopathy is a disease complex associated with the capture or handling of any wild animal. The body’s reaction to abnormal states such as infection, injury, extreme temperature, or even fear is stress. Capture and restraining an injured or ill animal is extremely stressful. Stress can result in capture myopathy. Therefore anyone handling wild animals in any professional capacity has capture myopathy on their mind most of the time.

Left truncation criteria for survival analysis of white-tailed deer, Wildlife (WilsonOnline), Aug 2016Survival estimates are commonly obtained by physically capturing wildlife and marking or affixing a transmitter to a representative sample of the population. Bias induced by capture stress can occur for white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) if capture influences the probability of mortality. To mitigate this bias, researchers often left truncate data for a threshold number of days (14–28 days for deer) after capture. Potential costs of left truncation include reduced sample size and reduced inference. Costs associated with capture and monitoring of deer are substantial, and defining a truncation period is usually arbitrary or ad hoc. Hence, researchers need to evaluate objectively the effects of left truncation. We analyzed time-to-event data from 1,001 radio-collared white-tailed deer from northern forests and eastern farmlands of Wisconsin, USA in 2011–2014 to evaluate justification for using a 2-week truncation period by comparing the probability of mortality for deer <2 weeks post-capture and deer ≥2 weeks post-capture. We found little support for a difference in mortality between the groups. Results accounting for time of year, study area, and age suggested a 0.69 probability that deer ≥2 weeks post- capture had a lower mortality rate than deer <2 weeks post-capture. Using a reference group of 6–10 -month-old deer in the eastern farmlands in 2011, cumulative capture season mortality was 0.102 (50% CI = 0.075–0.125; SE = 0.037) for deer <2 weeks post-capture and 0.114 (50% CI = 0.087–0.138; SE = 0.037) for deer ≥2 weeks post-capture.

Deer: Trap & Relocate, City of Bloomington, IN, 2013?High Mortality:
Studies have shown that approximately 4% of the deer die in transport, as many as 25% of translocated deer die within the first two months of trapping and translocation, and more than 85% of deer may not survive longer than one year.

Capture Myopathy- Ozark

Capture Myopathy, Wild Instincts, Sept 9, 2012There are four categories of capture myopathy ranging from peracute with death resulting in a matter of minutes to chronic where the animal may survive days or even months, but will often die from heart failure.

MANAGING WHITE-TAILED DEER IN MICHIGAN: CAPTURE AND TRANSLOCATION AS A MEANS OF POPULATION CONTROL, MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES, WILDLIFE ISSUE REVIEW PAPER 9, December 11, 2000

Factors Affecting Capture Myopathy in White-Tailed Deer, Jeff Beringer, Lonnie P. Hansen, William Wilding, John Fischer and Steven L. Sheriff, The Journal of Wildlife Management, Apr, 1996 (Jstor)Capture myopathy can be a significant cause of mortality for white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and other ungulates. Capture and handling may affect rates of myopathy.

Comments are closed